Leaving Las Vegas: ALA Annual Conference Roundup, round 1

Wherein we distill thoughts on ALA Annual 2014. First up, a couple of non-preservation sessions. The preservation notes will be posted soon.

On Introverts

Jennifer Kahnweiler, PhD,  author of A Quiet Influence: The Introverts Guide to Making A Difference, gave the ALCTS President’s Program keynote on the power of quiet influence and the strengths that introverts bring to the workplace.  When asked to raise their hand in response to the question, “How many of you are introverts?” roughly 95% of the audience agreed. This is not a surprise to anyone in Libraryland, right? What is different is that Ms. Kahnweiler, who self identifies as an extrovert, is not out to make us into something we are not or to imply, as so many do, that being an introvert is a bad thing or that we should necessarily change into extroverts. She was here to instead help us realize our strengths and help us identify how we can use those strengths to better navigate our work.

By definition introverts are energized from within while extroverts get energized by people and places around them. Neither is a bad way of being, they are just different. Let us remember, too, that while you may have tendencies one way or the other, we often possess qualities of both the introvert and the extrovert and some of us have learned to “turn on” one or the other when the situation requires.

The characteristics of introverts are:

  • Analytical
  • Patient
  • Think before they speaking
  • A sense of both humility and privacy [which makes them terrific librarians I suspect]

Introverts are found in every industry and they can exact influence even if they are not in positions of power by challenging the status quo and inspiring change. Introverted leaders tend to be more analytical and listen more to their employees. According to Kahnweiler, we need introverts’ quiet influence now more than ever.

Challenges for introverts in the workplace include:

  • People exhaustion
  • Having to make fast decisions
  • Teams
  • Selling yourself
  • Putting on a happy face (she says the question introverts hate most is “what’s wrong?” because they tend not to demonstrably show their emotions)

How introverts can successfully navigate the workplace

Kahnweiler suggests ways that introverts can successfully navigate the workplace. If you manage introverts, these are good things to realize and provide space for if you want the most out of your staff. She stresses that introverts make an impact by quietly influencing people. These “ripples of influence” can change the workplace and make a huge impact on individuals and organizations.

Preparation—Taking time to adequately prepare for meetings or presentations helps alleviate anxiety.

Taking quiet time—Introverts are thinkers and need time and space to think through problems and find solutions.

Engaged listening—Listening provides a chance to build rapport and understand issues and concerns at a deeper level. Engaged listening is about connecting to the other person, not making the conversation about yourself. Of course, if all you do is listen, you run the risk of being perceived as not having an opinion or an idea. You also run the risk of being the person in the office people come to so they can vent, which can be stressful. Key tips: don’t multi task, bracket your thoughts (take random thoughts and put them in a ‘parking lot’ so you can concentrate on listening and being present), ask yourself “what can I learn from this?,” and move your body and be healthy.

Writing–Introverts can use writing as a way to gather thoughts and express ideas.

Thoughtful use of social media–She urges introverts to start with just 15 minutes a day and try social media as a way to build community and make connections. This is one part of her talk that really didn’t wring too true for me personally. I find that librarians and archivists have embraced social media with vigor, but then that is the pool in which I swim so maybe more people than not feel social media is too stressful.

More on Introverts

Susan Cain, “The Power of Introverts” TED Talk (February 2012); an animated version from RSA Shorts is here.

Bryan Walsh, “The Power of Shyness” Time Magazine February 26, 2012. [Walsh erroneously used “shyness” when he means “introvert.”]

Tumblarian Talk

This was a great conversation starter, I only wish the session lasted longer. My library is new to Tumblr and we are trying to build our community there. We will be participating in the #5DaysOfPreservation event the week of July 14th to help build that presence but I wanted to attend this to find out more.

If you are on Twitter, search #tumblariantalk for posts from the panel discussion. The panelists started with very brief statements with the conversation following. The panelists’ slideshows are online. A list of Tumblarians including some on the panel can be found on The Lifeguard Librarian’s site.

 

Ian Stade, Hennipin Co Library

Show unique items
Timely topics, post content that relates
Guest posts from interns and volunteers
Partner with researchers to show their work and interests

 

Colleen Theisen, University of Iowa Special Collections and University Archives

They have five Tumblrs with special collections content, organized by single collection, theme or department
Reblogs across tumblers
Feeds Instagram directly to Tumblr
Participate in common themes such as Miniature Mondays and Throwback Thursdays to create quick content
Don’t forget to use hashtags

 

Katie Anderson, Rutgers Special Collections (Paul Robeson Library)

Survey says 27% public and about 30% academic and special collections are using Twitter [see the survey information on slideshare]
Enable questions and submissions to facilitate conversation
Use your Tumblr description to market yourself and say something about who and where you are (many people ignore this)

 

Rachel Dobkin, Gov-info.tumblr.com

Tumblr is a project of LIS-GISIG students, their motto is “Making gov docs sexy since 2012”
Gets content from a variety of government blogs and social media
Defines government documents as anything any government agency ever touched even a little bit
Highlights data, services, health, archives, etc.
Information activism is an interest for her and trying to get more people involved
Hunts down documents when she reads in the news that “data or documents aren’t available”
Posts about every day
NASA pics are most popular

 

Daniel Ransom, Holy Names University

Tumblr is a mix of personal and professional acct
Alternative to using exclusively twitter or other format
Likes Tumblr for its responsiveness
Easy to connect to other librarians and the tone is generally positive

 

Molly Wetta, Lawrence public library

Focus is on readers advisory
Tries to post twice a day and wants half to be original content
Highlights local events and does readers advisory posts that relate
Produce readers advisory charts and graphs, insanely popular
Book reviews are popular

 

Audience discussion

How do you measure “success” with social media?

  • Weekly stats
  • Google analytics (add Google analytics id)
  • User quotes, collect the anecdotal evidence when you get it
  • No analytics for rss and reblogs
  • Journalists can find your posts and get you visibility
  • Questions through Tumblr are as valid as in person reference questions

Responding to criticism, some do, some don’t. Most of the Tumblarians on the panel were trying to make special collections accessible and don’t get a lot of negative feedback.

When you reblog, try to add info or sources that you may have that can add to the conversation.

How do you engage with students directly? Enable questions, put email on account, keep track of local community tagging trends.

Censorship, should we or no? Mostly no, one person did take down one post by request, she had permission to post a photo but made it into a gif and the person who gave permission didn’t like that and requested they take it down.

 

 

Madeline Kelly Wins Jan Merrill-Oldham Grant

From the PADG listserv, 2/5/2014:

Madeline Kelly is the 2014 recipient of the Jan Merrill-Oldham Professional Travel Grant. The grant, consisting of a $1,250 cash award donated by the Library Binding Institute, will support Madeline’s attendance at ALA Annual in Las Vegas. The grant is awarded by the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services Preservation and Reformatting Section to provide librarians and para-professionals new to the preservation field with the opportunity to attend the ALA Annual Conference and to encourage professional development through active participation at the national level.

Madeline received her MLIS from Simmons College in 2012. She currently works as Collection Development Support Specialist at George Mason University, where she has been proactively growing her preservation knowledge while increasingly taking on preservation responsibilities. Madeline looks forward to connecting with the ALA preservation community in support of her professional development and her efforts to help George Mason University develop their preservation program.

The award citation will be presented at the ALCTS Awards Ceremony during the ALA Annual Meeting on Saturday, June 28, 5:30-7:00 pm.

Anne Kenney wins Atkinson Memorial Award

From the ALA newsroom:

CHICAGO — Anne R. Kenney, Carl A. Kroch University Librarian at Cornell University, has been named the 2014 winner of the Hugh C. Atkinson Memorial Award. Kenney will receive a cash award and citation during the 2014 ALA Annual Conference in Las Vegas.

Named in honor of one of the pioneers of library automation, the Atkinson Award recognizes an academic librarian who has made significant contributions in the area of library automation or management and has made notable improvements in library services or research.

“The nomination for Anne R. Kenney presented the committee with an extraordinary tour of innovative achievements and service to the profession,” said Lisa Carlucci Thomas, Hugh C. Atkinson Memorial Award committee chair and director at Design Think Do. “Anne’s leadership on significant projects, such as 2CUL, arXiv, Project Euclid and Making of America;her influential work on large-scale digitization and digital preservation standards and her global contributions in Myanmar, Cuba, China and beyond demonstrates her outstanding creativity, agility, risk-taking and collaborative spirit.”

KenneyAnne2-12“Anne’s peers describe her as a ‘fearless visionary,’ ‘a thoughtful, intellectual leader’ and a ‘digital library pioneer;’ noting that ‘Hugh Atkinson himself would be proud’ to call her a colleague,” continued Thomas. “Several colleagues who knew Hugh Atkinson shared examples of how ‘Anne Kenney brings Hugh’s spirit of technology-harnessing, tradition-busting leadership – with an additional dash of adventure as well.’ She inspires and generates enthusiasm for new programs and strategies and thrives to bring individuals together around a shared purpose.”

Kenney received her B.A. from Duke University, cum laude, her M.A. in History, with distinction, from the University of Missouri-St. Louis and her M.A.L.S. from the University of Missouri-Columbia.

The Hugh C. Atkinson Award is jointly sponsored by four divisions of the American Library Association: the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL), the Association for Library Collections and Technical Services (ALCTS), the Library Leadership and Management Association (LLAMA) and the Library and Information Technology Association (LITA). The award is funded from an endowment established to honor Hugh C. Atkinson.

2014 ALA Midwinter: RBMS Tech Services Agenda

If anyone would like to report back for us on this meeting, please let Holly or myself know. Holly will be at midwinter, but I will not, so our reporting strength will be somewhat limited. Be a contributor!–Beth

 

RBMS Technical Services Discussion Group

ALA Midwinter Meeting, 2014

January 26, 10:30-11:30am

Pennsylvania Convention Center  115A

Draft Agenda

  1. Introductions
  2. Collaboration and Communication

Cataloging departments can tend to be insular places, yet for many catalogers, interaction and dialogue with other departments can be a huge help to our work. How do we make the most of our relationships with public service, acquisitions, or preservation departments?  What information can be both given and received from working with other areas of the library, and how might that help us create better information and a more useful experience for our patrons?

Come share your experiences of working with the other professionals of your library. What have been some successful workflows? What have been some spectacular miscommunications that might shed light on how we can work with each other in the future?  Both the challenges and the triumphs of collaboration will be discussed.

3. News and Announcements

Nominations Sought for ALCTS Awards

Please consider making nominations for 2014 ALCTS Awards:

Innovation awards
http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2013/09/alcts-seeking-2014-innovation-awards-nominations

Publications awards
http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2013/09/dec-1-deadline-alcts-2014-publication-awards-nominations

Preservation awards
http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2013/09/alcts-2014-preservation-awards-nominations-sought

Includes the Banks/Harris Preservation Award, the George Cunha and Susan Swartzburg Preservation Award, and the Jan Merrill-Oldham Professional Development Grant.  

Recognition awards
http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2013/09/search-begins-alcts-2014-professional-recognition-awards-nominations

Continuing Resources/serials awards
http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2013/09/alcts-seeking-2014-continuing-resources-awards-candidates

Ross Atkinson Lifetime Achievement award
http://www.ala.org/news/press-releases/2013/09/alcts-2014-ross-atkinson-award-nominations-sought

ALA Midwinter 2012: Preservation Administrators Interest Group Meeting Roundup

Written by Laura Bedford and woefully late in posting by me. Sorry Laura for the delay, and thanks for your notes. By sharing information like this, especially when travel budgets are so tight, we all benefit.

Preservation week  April 22-28, 2012

Two websites:

  1.  ALCTS website (http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/alcts/confevents/preswk/plan.cfm)  – for institutions to grab materials off for their own sessions;  it will contain a map of events for preservation week – you input info and it’s updated. (thru ALCTS)
  2. @ your library pass it on website (http://www.atyourlibrary.org/passiton)  – more for the public – what’s going on during the week, including  family focused events and activities.

@your library  will have different daily content focus:    AV, quilts, comic books, slides,  digital photos, family docs; it will include both video and print content.

There will be 2 webinars during Preservation Week  –  Tuesday : textile collections care;  Thursday:  digital photo conservation.

Also look to @facebook   facebook.com/preservationweek and @twitter.com/#/PreservationWk

Preservation week national spokesperson – Steve Berry.  He’ll speak on Monday 1/23 about his “ History Matters”  organization created by him and wife.

There’s a Preservation Week booth for the first time at ALA – will be continued through other meetings, staffed by volunteers.

IMLS Fellows

  • Annie Peterson –  IMLS Fellow at Yale, MLIS at Urbana-Champ, intern at UCLA and George Blood
  • Nick Szydlowski – IMLS Fellow at NYPL; IMLS at Simmons, works at MIT.
  • Kimberly Tarr – NYU moving image program; prior A/V project at Smithsonian’s NMAH; auditing NYPL audio spaces.

All will be presenting at ALA Annual in Anaheim on their fellowships.  Also Evelyn Frangakis from  NYPL will be organizing a memorial for Jan Merrill-Oldham  at PAIG at Annual – contact her if you want to be involved.

Managing an efficient local book scanning workstation

Roger Smith – Head of the Preservation and Digital Library programs at UC San Diego

UCSD just completed contract with Google – selecting material for digitization to fill in gaps in rare materials that weren’t sent thru the google process.  Working through a rights checklist assessment process, determining what will be viewed at a local level or publicly.  Asking questions to find out what materials fall in private and public levels.   Why are we digitizing – for preservation, access, both? What costs are associated with collaborating with other institutions?  Focus on managing assets going forward.  He looked system wide in UC’s,  starting with combined metadata repository, in efforts to break down silos within UCSD.

Setting yourself up – currently he has one scanner, buying a second.  What level of work you expect to do  should drive what and how many scanners you purchase.  What special needs do the materials entail – what about automated features?  What is the budget?  UCSD chose manual page turning feature, to be able to send special collections material thru it.  What’s your time frame?  Important to get a loaner from a vendor first, or plan site visits to check it out and talk to other customers – like at ALA.

Proposal management –get buy in from other depts.; create a proposal mgmt process from the library to help other depts. go thru and manage their expectations; define the purpose, value, audience, timeline, collection description, number of objects, condition, metadata, staffing, funding and approval tracking.  Many depts. came with good ideas but didn’t have answers to questions at the offset – needed to go thru proposal mgmt process before beginning.

Continue reading

ALA Midwinter on Twitter

Late to the party as usual, but we want to share some of the hashtags on Twitter where we are finding info from this weekend’s sessions. We are also seeking volunteers to share their notes and observations from the PARS and RBMS sessions here on PCAN. Drop us a note either in the comments or through email if you want to share.

#digitization

#archives

#alamw12

#alamw

#ALCTS

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